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108Episodes
Performing Arts

Most creatives do their work out of the limelight, grinding it out and hoping to make a living from what they love most. Whatever applause may come, though, pales in comparison to the weeks and months of rejection and persistence that precede any such recognition. This is the central message that is shared and celebrated on this podcast, hosted by Patrick Oliver Jones, an actor who knows first-hand the ups and downs we all face.

Episodes

Well, coronavirus is all people can talk about. It has completely changed our daily lives and interactions with others, especially in the world of theater. So I wanted to address it head on with friend-of-the-podcast Clayton Howe. We share how each of us lost our jobs and what we're doing now to keep going and make it through this extraordinary time in the world. 

I also give 5 ways we as artists can regain control during a very uncertain moment in our lives and careers: Commitment, Outside, Variety, Introspection, and Dreams. 

To follow Clayton and his podcast Entertainment(x): 
instagram.com/inclaynation & entertainmentx.podbean.com/ 

Articles mentioned in this episode: 

  • How stress influences disease - Science Daily
  • A Connecticut Theater Finds New Ways To Get Art To Audiences - WSHU
  • Getting At Least 7 Hours Of Sleep Helps Prevent Colds - NPR
  • How Coronavirus Impacts Broadway – Variety
  • How Coronavirus Shifted the World of Theater - The Guardian
  • Broadway Finds a Way for the Show to Go On - NBC News 

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May this podcast be a resource for you as you discover more ways to pursue a career in this industry and sustain it through the many ups and downs that follow. 
 
For further insights (Twitter) and unreleased audio clips of today's interview (Instagram) be a part of the WINMI community on social media @winmipodcast. And you can always reach out to me on the website: contact.winmipodcast.com 

Lastly, this podcast is supported through kind donations of listeners like you by buying me a coffee

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Music used in this episode:

"March" by Kai Engel is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License

"Jazz Brunch" by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Attribution 3.0 International License

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Welcome to another FINAL FIVE Bonus Episode! After our conversation on Wednesday about opera and directing, Charlotte gave her answers to five questions and topics not covered in the main interview.

Also, in honor of Women's History Month, this week's Broadway pioneer is Vinnette Justine Carroll, PhD. As an actress and playwright and later as a director, she holds the distinction of many firsts in theater and television: first black female to direct on Broadway as well as receive a Tony nomination for direction, and the first African-American to appear in a week-long television show.

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Please consider buying me a coffee to support this work that goes into each episode.
 
Join the WINMI community by following on Instagram or Twitter (@winmipodcast) as well as reaching out to Patrick with any questions or comments: contact.winmipodcast.com
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Charlotte Cohn was born in Denmark and raised in Israel where she served in the Israeli Army as a commanding officer. She was a founding producer of the New York Music Theatre Festival (NYMF) and MainStreet Musicals. Other producing credits include Rated P For Parenthood, The New York Times critics’ pick Handle With Care and Church & State.

In this episode she chronicles her journey from commander to singer, from Broadway actress to Off-Broadway producer and director. Despite the setbacks faced as she progressed from one to the other, her passion and persistence kept her going...along with a good sense of humor.

Follow her on Twitter (@charlottecohn) as well as her website: https://charlottecohn.wixsite.com/charlotte

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May this podcast be a resource for you as you discover more ways to pursue a career in this industry and sustain it through the many ups and downs that follow.
 
For further insights (Twitter) and unreleased audio clips of today's interview (Instagram) be a part of the WINMI community on social media @winmipodcast. And you can always reach out to me on the website: contact.winmipodcast.com 

Lastly, this podcast is supported through kind donations of listeners like you by buying me a coffee.

 

  • "Traces" by Hyson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License.
  • "Here" by Hyson is licensed under a Attribution License.
  • "September" by Kai Engel is licensed under a Attribution License.
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After our in-depth discussion on producing in NYC and balancing that with an acting career, Abigail now shares bucket lists and who she looks up to. These final five questions get into topics and insights not covered in our previous conversation.

  • If you could have any other job outside of the arts what would it be?
  • What is a bucket list role or show you still hope to do one day?
  • Who do you look up to? A mentor or someone who inspires you.
  • Name a lesson or trait that took you awhile to learn or one that you are still learning to this day?
  • What’s the best advice you’ve received?

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Please consider buying me a coffee to support this work that goes into each episode.
 
Do you have questions or stories of your own? Share them with me:
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For the first episode of Women's History Month, I'm talking to New York-Los Angeles actress and producer Abigail Rose Solomon, who founded Rosalind Productions in 2005.

We talk about the differences between acting and producing NYC and LA as well as her process of finding shows and working on them with other producers and creatives.

Rosalind Productions' credits include THE PROM, THREE TALL WOMEN, WAR PAINT, THE LAST SEDER, PROOF, and AS YOU LIKE IT.

Also, this week's female Broadway pioneer is Cheryl Crawford, founder of Group Theater and the Actors Studio.

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May this podcast be a resource for you as you discover more ways to pursue a career in this industry and sustain it through the many ups and downs that follow.
 
For further insights (Twitter) and unreleased audio clips of today's interview (Instagram) be a part of the WINMI community on social media @winmipodcast. And you can always reach out to me on the website: contact.winmipodcast.com 

Lastly, this podcast is supported through kind donations of listeners like you by buying me a coffee.

 

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Music: September by Kai Engel is licensed under a Attribution License.

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The 2nd Annual Auditions Stories is here! And this is only part one...focusing on the Audition Book and debunking 5 myths about what this book is supposed to be.

  • The typical audition book has at least 20 songs (or monologues).
  • It must contain material from every genre and era.
  • "Show your range" means to hit your highest note.
  • You don't need the full song in your book.
  • It doesn't have to have a table of contents.

Here are the former guests featured in this episode with all-new stories from the audition room (click on their name to listen to their episode):

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May this podcast be a resource as you discover more ways to pursue a career in this industry and sustain it through the many ups and downs that follow. You can always reach out to me on the website: contact.winmipodcast.com
 
For insights and unreleased audio clips of today's interview, you can be a part of the WINMI community on Twitter and Instagram (@winmipodcast).
 
Lastly, this podcast is supported through kind donations of listeners like you by buying me a coffee.

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This podcast mainly focuses on the artist and the creative, the actor or composer or director, etc. But in today’s episode I’m turning the tables and focusing on the audience, specifically those who are deaf and hard of hearing. Their access to what we do onstage is often limited and often times they can’t make it to the theater because there is no way provided for them to understand what is happening. That’s where sign language interpreters come in and provide access for this underserved community of theater-goers.

(Click here for a full transcript of this episode at the WINMI Blog.)

The history of ASL-interpreted shows is actually fairly young. It was not until the early 1980s that the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles would offer the first regularly-scheduled ASL-interpreted performances of theatre in the nation. This was spurred on by its own success with the play Children of a Lesser God in 1979, which went on to a Broadway production and won the Tony Award for Best Play in 1980. (Source: howlround.com, an essay by David Kurs)

In fact, Children of a Lesser God had a Broadway revival a couple of years ago and I was grateful to have one of the actors from that play, John McGinty, on the podcast. (Listen to that conversation here: smarturl.it/johnmcginty) As I was putting together this episode, I contacted John again and asked him about the importance of ASL-interpreted shows:

"It is imperative to show that audiences prefer the personal aspect that a great, certified, sign language interpreter can bring to a theater performance. It helps build a “family” and a sense of belonging in the audience for those who happen to be Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Also, once the audience sees that the show is interpreted, they will be able to leave and say, 'Hey, I saw a show that was interpreted.' This will at least build a foundation and awareness of the Deaf/HoH community in their future."

Recently one of our FOOTLOOSE shows on Norwegian Cruise Lines was ASL-interpreted by two women who travel to many different events and venues to provide sign language interpretation, Heidi Johnson and Mia Engle. In all my contracts aboard ships I’ve never seen ASL done for any show, so it was a real honor to be a part of the night’s presentation and it was an even bigger pleasure to sit down with them and talk about the important work they do. These are some of the people and topics covered in this episode:

  • Mairéad MacSweeney - Director of the Deafness, Cognition, and Language Research Centre at the University College London
  • Children of a Lesser God - A play by Mark Medoff based on a story written about deaf characters for deaf actors in the late ‘70s—featuring a deaf woman named Sarah Norman who falls in love with a speech therapist named James Leeds.
  • John McGinty - Deaf actor and advocate, who also teaches sign language
  • David Kurs - Artistic Director of Deaf West theater company
  • Prosody - the rhythmic structure, intonation, and stress in spoken and signed languages

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The time and expense needed to bring these guests and conversations to you each week is sometimes challenging but always rewarding. Please consider donating and supporting the work that goes into each episode. donate.winmipodcast.com
 
Join the WINMI community by following on Instagram or Twitter as well as reaching out to me with any questions or comments: contact.winmipodcast.com
 
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January 6, 2020

Season Four Preview

Hello and welcome to Season 4 of Why I’ll Never Make It! This is now a year-round podcast...more work for me and more conversations for you. The central theme of Why I’ll Never Make It remains in tact of course: to feature meaningful conversations with actors, singers, directors, and other creatives on the setbacks and stumbles we all us face in the performing arts and how we overcome them, all while challenging the notion of what it really means to “make it” in this business.

I’m your host Patrick Oliver Jones, now entering my 3rd year as a podcaster and my 28th year as a professional actor and singer. I’ll be your guide each week, bringing you 45 to 60 minutes of interviews, insights, and interesting stories about how we balance making art with making a living.

Every now and then, you’ll also get some bonus episodes from The Spotlight Series, where I talk to non-profit organizations (like ASTEP) making a difference in the arts and beyond. Also this season, the Final Five continues where I end each conversation with the same five questions to each guest. There will also be themed months like Women’s History in March, the Tony Awards in May, and celebrating community theater in September.

Be sure to follow on Instagram, where you’ll find unreleased audio clips from my interviews and behind the scenes photos. Follow on Twitter for motivations, updates, and related articles to each week’s discussion. On the website winmipodcast.com you can connect with me as well as donate to the ongoing work and efforts of this podcast.

I can’t wait for you to join me and my guests on Why I’ll Never Make It! Please share this podcast with anyone you know who could also benefit from these conversations. Now go dive into the episodes and remember the reasons for not "making it" may be countless and arbitrary, but the reasons to keep going are even more numerous and rewarding.

Cheers,
Patrick

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December 28, 2019

A Look Back at 2019

Welcome to the 2nd Anniversary episode of the podcast! And what a year it has been!

We’ve had wonderful guests from actors and singers to stage managers and artistic directors. And this episode is a look back at some of the best moments from the past year as well as a look ahead to what’s in store for 2020.
 
There’s a mix of previous released conversations and new clips never heard before now. I share clips from the popular Audition Stories episode, and then I highlight and critique the very first episode of the year, which was not my best to say the least.
 
The guests featured during this anniversary: (click the name to go to their episode)
 
 
With a special appearance by Andre DeShields (on the Tony Awards). 
 
Check out these podcasts by… 
Maggie Bera -  ACTOR AESTHETIC
Ilana Levine - LITTLE KNOWN FACTS
 
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The time and expense needed to bring these guests and conversations to you each week is sometimes challenging but always rewarding. Please consider buying me a coffee to support this work that goes into each episode.
 
Join the WINMI community by following on Instagram or Twitter as well as reaching out to Patrick with any questions or comments: contact.winmipodcast.com
 
Your donation will go directly into the podcast, helping to grow the WINMI community and allowing me to do so with greater ease and effectiveness. I wouldn't be here without listeners like you, so your donations are greatly appreciated. All donors will be recognized in a future episode for their generosity.
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ASTEP was conceived by Broadway Musical Director Mary-Mitchell Campbell and Juilliard students. It’s goal was to transform the lives of youth using the most powerful tool they had: their art. Today, ASTEP connects performing and visual artists with youth from underserved communities in the U.S. and around the world to awaken their imaginations, foster critical thinking, and help them break the cycle of poverty.
 
ASTEP is deeply committed to empowering individuals who suffer from an absence of choice, especially children. The right to choose is a fundamental human right, and we strive to end the poverty that robs us of that humanity. The performing and visual arts create a unique safe space to rediscover choice.
 
To talk about that mission as well as the recruiting and training of volunteer teaching artists is ASTEP’s Manager of Programs, Samantha Manfredi. She shares how these programs currently serve youth affected by immigration status, homelessness, gun-violence, incarceration, the justice system, HIV/AIDS, systemic poverty, and the caste system. Yet despite all these challenges ASTEP finds a way to reach these young people and change their lives. 
 
The Teaching Artists are highly successful Broadway performers, professional artists, or students and faculty from schools such as Juilliard, offering a variety of disciplines such as dance, visual art, music, and drama. They become transformative role models by combining their passion for the arts and their ability to use artistic tools to teach important life skills to young people around the world.
 
Learn how you can support ASTEP through a DONATION or as a TEACHING ARTIST.
 
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Join the WINMI community by following on Instagram or Twitter as well as reaching out to Patrick with any questions or comments: contact.winmipodcast.com
 
Your donation will go directly into the podcast, helping to grow the WINMI community and allowing me to do so with greater ease and effectiveness. I wouldn't be here without listeners like you, so your donations are greatly appreciated. All donors will be recognized in a future episode for their generosity.
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