Performing Arts

Weekly conversations and insights on the fine line between setback and success in the performing arts. Fellow creatives share their own journey as artists and the lessons learned along the way with host Patrick Oliver Jones, an actor who knows first-hand the ups and downs we all face.

Episodes

Carrie Bernans is the perfect person to kick off Women's History Month. She is a strong individual who knows who she is, what she wants, and usually how to get there. That’s not to say it’s been all smooth sailing for her, either personally or professionally, but she never lost her faith or belief in what’s possible.

She isn’t just an actress, she’s also trained in martial arts, stunt work, and body movement in addition to theater. Growing up she not only performed in plays and dance recitals but also competed in track and field. She’s been a world traveler and now speaks six different languages. There is simply no way to pigeonhole Carrie into this box or that genre. And it is this variety in her life and her work that has created so much opportunity for her, particularly landing roles in Black Panther and Avengers: Endgame.

Sign up for the WINMI newsletter and get 25% off a WeAudition membership. 

Learn more about CB Seed - https://www.cbseed.org/

Follow Carrie - Website / Instagram / Twitter / IMDB

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Season 5 offers plenty of ways to connect with me and the guests as well as opportunities to learn and grow as an artist:

Why I’ll Never Make It is a Top 25 Theater Podcast on Feedspot 

Music used in the episode by Blue Dot Sessions and John Bartmann is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

 

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In the second half of our conversation, Erin Cherry focuses on her weekly show Sundays with a Cherry on Top, a health and lifestyle show that showcases Black Culture in all its forms. She also joined playwright Mfoniso Udofia, Ngozi Anyanwu, and Chinyere Anyanwu as a founder producer of NOW Africa. This playwrights festival seeks to introduce, and sometimes reintroduce, artists and academics to the masters of African Dramatic Literature, both classic and contemporary.

Thank you for joining me and Cherry for these episodes. Stay tuned next week for my conversation with Adrienne Walker from The Lion King.

join.whyillnevermakeit.com

Follow Cherry: Website / Instagram / YouTube

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Season 5 brings with it a new ways connect with me and the guests and new opportunities to learn and grow as an artist:

Why I’ll Never Make It is a Top 20 Theater Podcast on Feedspot 

Music used in the episode by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

 

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Mid-March of this year was a uniquely devastating time for theater and the arts industry as a whole. Broadway and Off-Broadway here in New York as well as theaters all around the country began to close for what they thought would be a possible one-month shut down. 

At the time playwright Lynn Nottage tweeted: “Emotionally and financially preparing for theaters across the country to be shut down. Mourning the beautiful work that will be lost. Alas, protecting our practitioners and our audiences is essential.”

But as you and I know, it’s lasted much longer than anyone anticipated. And while the loss of jobs and the lack of theater options for audiences were immediately felt, there has been a further impact in communities and states around the country. From regional and local theaters to touring companies, stage work has a financial impact beyond just the box office. 

For example, the 2016-17 touring season in cities like Charlotte, NC generated more than $38.2 million in economic impact. In Tempe, AZ their Broadway Season brought in $100 million. And more recently, in Denver the seven-week pre-Broadway run of frozen added about $30 million to the local economy. Theater and the arts are a driving economic indicator in cities and regions around the country, which is why it is vital that we save this industry and do what we can to become an arts hero.

Be An Arts Hero is an intersectional grassroots movement emphasizes arts and cultures $877 billion value added contribution to the nation's economy, highlighting the human and financial toll of letting the contribution collapse. Carson Elrod and Brooke Ishibashi, two of the organization's founders, join the podcast today to share their goal of keeping all 5.1 million Americans who work in the arts 1) alive 2) in their homes and 3) with jobs to return to when the crisis subsides.

Join their efforts: https://beanartshero.com/get-involved 

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Music used in this episode: 
"Appreciation" by Chad Crouch is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Co-creator of The Ensemblist podcast and blog shares his love of theater, especially for those out of the spotlight and in the ensemble. Mo Brady grew up building sets and imagining a life on the stage. After finally getting his Broadway debut, two other more personal roles came his way: husband and father. But he still manages to keep up the podcasting and working on the communications team at Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. http://www.theensemblist.com/podcasts 

Don't forget to check out all the resources available to you through WINMI: resources.winmipodcast.com 

Share your feedback at survey.winmipodcast.com 

Follow Mo: Instagram / Twitter 

Follow WINMI: Instagram / Twitter / Blog 

Donate to the podcast: https://ko-fi.com/winmipodcast 

 

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WINMI is a Top 20 Theater Podcast thanks to you!  https://blog.feedspot.com/theatre_podcasts/ 

 
 
Music used in this episode: 
"Hill and Dale" and "Daydream" by Chad Crouch are licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License
"Smooth Actor" by Podington Bear is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License. Based on a work at http://soundofpicture.com
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Instead of answering the Final Five questions, Erin Cronican continues our conversation on producing theater for the online world as well as some insight into her cooking habits (or lack thereof).

 

For now, COVID has ended live theater as we know it, and digital platforms have become a new home for actors and writers to reach audiences. So Erin shares how she's made it work and how Actors Equity Association has (not) helped.

 

Follow Erin: Instagram / Twitter 

 - Donate to the The Seeing Place 

 

Follow WINMI: Instagram / Twitter / Blog 

 - Newsletter / Survey: whyillnevermakeit.com

 

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WINMI is a Top 20 Theater Podcast thanks to you!  https://blog.feedspot.com/theatre_podcasts/ 

 
The time and expense needed to bring these guests and conversations to you each week is sometimes challenging but always rewarding. Please consider buying me a coffee to support this work that goes into each episode.

 

 
The instrumental song "Smooth Actor" by Podington Bear is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License. Based on a work at http://soundofpicture.com
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Erin Cronican first came on the podcast back in Season One, sharing the ups and downs of making theater while still being an actor. Today, she faces new challenges of producing theater in the middle of a pandemic while also battling cancer once again.

She opens up about her very real and present reality, just living 3 months at a time. Legacy has become very important to her, and through our conversation she shares insights into living with a terminal illness and how it changes the way she approaches theater and the idea of bucket lists.

Follow Erin: Instagram / Twitter 

 - Donate to the The Seeing Place: resources.winmipodcast.com 

Follow WINMI: Instagram / Twitter / Blog 

 - Take the Survey / Join the newsletter: whyillnevermakeit.com

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WINMI is a Top 20 Theater Podcast thanks to you!  https://blog.feedspot.com/theatre_podcasts/ 

The time and expense needed to bring these guests and conversations to you each week is sometimes challenging but always rewarding. Please consider buying me a coffee to support this work that goes into each episode.
 
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Music used in this episode:
 - "Whispers" by Hyson is licensed under a Attribution License
 - "Cobweb Morning" by Kai Engel is licensed under a Attribution License
 - "Smooth Actor" by Podington Bear is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License. Based on a work at http://soundofpicture.com
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In the last episode, Rebecca Selkowe reminded us of the groundwork needed to organize and manage our money. Today, she brings it to the present with useful tips and insights we can use during times of crisis like COVID-19.

For more on how The Actors Fund can help you (or ways you can donate to them) go to actorsfund.org and for a mental and artistic break from the daily grind go to starsinthehouse.com, hosted by Seth Rudetsky & James Wesley and benefiting The Actors Fund.

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Do you have specific questions? Anything you need? Reach out to me with anyway I can be of help: contact.winmipodcast.com

Also, join the WINMI Community on Twitter and Instagram @winmipodcast.

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Since 1955, April 15th has been Tax Day, until this year...the year of COVID-19 and economic uncertainty. With so many unemployed, especially those of us in the arts, what are we to do. How can we manage our money? What money!?

In this episode, I'm sharing my conversation a year ago with Rebecca Selkowe, author of DOMINATE YOUR DEBT and head of the Financial Wellness Program at the Actors Fund in New York City. This is part one, where she gives us the basics of how we need to approach financial matters, not just from a numbers perspective but also the mental and emotional aspects as well.

Part two comes in the next episode, where Rebecca joins me again to talk about the here and now and what we need to do today to make it through such tough economic times brought on by quarantines, self-isolations, and shutdowns.

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May this podcast be a resource for you as you discover more ways to pursue a career in this industry and sustain it through the many ups and downs that follow. 

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Music used in the episode:

- Theme songs from both Why I’ll Never Make It and The Spotlight Series, created by Patrick Oliver Jones on GarageBand.
- "Miss You" by Podington Bear is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.

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MAESTRA MUSIC was founded by composer/lyricist and music director Georgia Stitt to give support, visibility, and community to the women who make the music in the musical theater industry. Their membership is made up of female-identifying, non-binary, and gender non-conforming composers, music directors, orchestrators, arrangers, copyists, rehearsal pianists and other musicians who are an underrepresented minority in musical theater.

For Women's History Month, Georgia continues our conversation from the previous episode, talking about her efforts to foster and celebrate more women in musical theater.

Also, in this episode is a feature on Mary Rodgers, daughter of famed composer Richard Rodgers and a composer in her own right of the rollicking musical comedy Once Upon A Mattress.

The episode ends with the Final Five questions posed to Georgia...all about bucket lists and the best advice she's received.

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The time and expense needed to bring these guests and conversations to you each week is both sometimes challenging but always rewarding. Please consider buying me a coffee to support this work that goes into each episode.
 
Do you have questions or stories of your own? Share them with the WINMI Community: contact.winmipodcast.com

 

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Throughout history artists have known that music provides benefits for both the creator and the listener. It can affect individuals in positive ways by inducing both psychological and physiological healing. This is especially true in the senior community. 
 
Sing For Your Seniors is a nonprofit built around the mission of enriching lives through the universal language of music. They bring professional artists to the communities of seniors in need...to entertain them, to foster inter-generational connection, and most especially to create shared joy.
 
Jackie Vanderbeck is the Founder and Producing Artistic Director of SFYS. From her great grandmother, whom she lovingly called grandma Dee Dee, she realized the enormous therapeutic value of music for seniors, especially those who are showing signs of withdrawal. And so in Grandma Dee Dee’s honor and memory she started SFYS in 2005 as a one-person a cappella hour at the Village Adult Day Center in New York’s West Village. But it has now grown into a much bigger organization, and today Jackie joins me in this Spotlight episode to talk about that journey. 
 
Last summer, she invited me to participate in one of their sessions at the Actors Fund Home in New Jersey. So we also talk about that experience and how SFYS brings hope and joy to a very vulnerable group that is often forgotten by our society.
 
Discussed in today's episode:

Follow Sing For Your Seniors: Website | Instagram | Twitter

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Contribute your own Audition Story: contact.winmipodcast.com
 
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For insights and unreleased audio clips of today's interview, you can be a part of the WINMI community on Twitter and Instagram and you can always reach out to me directly: whyillnevermakeit@gmail.com
 
Lastly, this podcast is supported through kind donations of listeners like you: buy me a coffee.
 
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Music used in this episode:
 
"Reverie (small theme)" (ft. Pitx), 2010 by _ghost.
 
"Stardust" by U.S. Army Blues is licensed under a Public Domain Mark 1.0 License.
 
 
"In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0).
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